clark gable mutiny on the bounty

This piece from 1935 was written by a reporter sent to the Catalina Island set of Mutiny on the Bounty.

Oh, to be the lone female reporter hunting down the scoop to the location shoot of the latest Clark Gable picture! Sounds glamorous, right? Apparently not…

If you’re going from Hollywood, you ride the film boat from San Pedro wharf direct to the Isthmus, some ten miles across Channel. The boat makes it once a day carrying passengers and supplies. And so, surrounded by eight twenty-gallon gasoline tanks, four cartons of strawberries, two dead sharks, (to be used for Bounty atmosphere), and six milk cans, I started my great expedition.

The sky was clear. The stars were shining. The sea was choppy and rough; but by sticking my head out of the side and missing the strong gasoline odor, I managed to keep the stomach quiet. (I am told Mr. Franchot Tone, making the same trip the night previous, was not so fortunate! On Mr. Gable’s trip, he yelled for more speed!) At 12:30am, we sighted land and the huge camp, “City of Men,” wherein were parked the hardy crew of actors and technicians, et al, for MGM’s “Mutiny on the Bounty.” There was a cottage reserved for me, and I fell instantly into its waiting bed.

At 5:30 the next morning—it seemed middle of the night—a siren blew. Well, go to the fire. But no, it was just the first call for breakfast. Another siren blew at six; and at 6:30, I found myself at breakfast in the camp’s main dining hall with an extremely sleepy-eyed Clark Gable, a silent Charles Laughton, and a very charmingly pleasant Director Frank Lloyd. (You know, of course, that most men are really not fit to speak to in the morning until they’ve had their coffee, and I would say that Mr. Laughton and Mr. Gable, charming as their manners were later on the day, would be no exception to this rule. Mr. Lloyd, by the time I arrived at the table, had had his coffee!)

Incidentally, forgetting the rule, I remarked brightly to Mr. Gable that it looked like a fine day, and after a terrific effort, he brought forth a smile and a mumble: Yes, it might be, but he hoped it wasn’t windy. Mr. Laughton merely remarked bitterly that if he got any more sunburned, he couldn’t work anymore. After the first few sips of coffee, they looked much brighter, and by the time we fell into another water-taxi—it was the same I had ridden the evening previous, only now it was headed for sea—the conversation was a little more stimulating, although far from brilliant.

Incidentally, would you like to know what they ate for breakfast, these film idols? Well, Mr. Gable, I must report, is a sissy eater. He had a glass of lime juice and two cups of coffee. No scrambled eggs or sausages for him. Not even a bit of dry toast. I thought he looked longingly at Charlie Laughton’s well-filled plate, but I couldn’t be sure until he told me later—goodness, bit then; he hardly mumbled a word then—that he had to watch his diet. Clark Gable watching his diet!

“I haven’t eaten a boiled potato in years,” he told me. “And I love ‘em. I come from a family of big men. Fatness is a family trait. I had a grand old uncle with a stomach like John L. Sullivan’s and six double chins. Well, I resemble him in features, but I don’t try the double chins. So it’s no beans or potatoes or any of the hearty foods I like, For Gable.”

It’s interesting, these comments about what Clark eats. I have read many accounts that say he didn’t eat breakfast except for coffee. But this here about him having not eaten potatoes in years…I am rather skeptical of that. Clark loved food, loved to eat. Often when filming he would watch what he ate but when he got time off he ate whatever he wanted. I’ve also heard he was not a morning person (yeah don’t blame him there).

The Bounty, anchored off the Isthmus every night, had already started out to sea under power of its auxiliary motor, and we caught up with it some three miles distant and clambered up its side. The deck of the Bounty, as I viewed it for the first time, was a sight never to be forgotten. As you know, the ship is a replica of the famous old vessel which sailed from England to Tahiti back in 1700. It is ninety feet long, has a twenty-four foot bean, and carried three masts, the mizzen, fore mast, and main mast. It is what is known technically as a square-rigger and in the early morning calm, its sails were still to be furled.

Sprawling on the deck, standing, sitting, or lounging against boxes, was the all-male cast, a picturesque sight in stripped sailor pants, bare feet, and colored ‘kerchiefs around their heads. The real crew, regular San Pedro seamen, were, much to their disgust, in the same garb as the cast. They had to be so costumed for atmosphere; but later in the day when close-ups were in order, they made a quick change to their grease-smudged blue jeans and flannel shirts and square-toed shoes.

The first scene on tap was that in the story where the sailors, after being becalmed for days, catch a whiff of wind. Clark, as Fletcher Christian, excitedly runs the length of the deck, and Mr. Laughton, as Captain Bligh, follows him.

The first I knew work was under way came with a sharp call from Director Lloyd: “Have we a captain on board? Get your hat off, Mr. Laughton, and let’s get going!” For Mr. Laughton, still wary of the beating rays of the sun, was lolling in what shadow he could find, a lovely white 1935 duck hat pulled securely over his face.

Over and over, they took that scene. And then close-ups. And then some shots of Donald Crisp as Seaman Burkett, fighting with hungry, snarling shipmates over the catch of a shark. It was, surprisingly, much as if you were watching movies made within the four walls of a studio stage, save for the background of the tall masts of the old square-rigger with its flopping sails and the blue Pacific.

My attention concentrated on Clark—(what female’s wouldn’t?). I found him putting extraordinary vigor and power into his scenes; and then between shots, he was alike a great big kid. For the most part, he acted more like an ingratiating, irresponsible small boy than a great big he-man. Always between scenes he was forever playing, and more excited about the possible chance of potting a live shark with his revolver, which he had brought along, than the scene to be shot. Once I thought Director Lloyd was going to have to reprimand him seriously for his romping. Someone had yelled, “There’s your shark, Clark,” and forgetting his scene, he had grabbed his gun and rushed to take aim. The cameras were set, the lighting was right, and Lloyd wanted action. He yelled, “Take your places!” Everyone but Clark was ready. Lloyd yelled again, “Come on, Clark, let the shark go.” Looking very much like a disappointed small boy called to supper from playing pirates, Clark came back to work.

Laughton was a great surprise to me. I thought, why, I don’t know, that he would be extremely British and stand-offish and very dignified. He was completely the opposite. Much more adult in his actions than Clark, he too relaxed between scenes, but by sitting and chatting of everything with prop boy or actor or—yours truly.

I was fascinated to watch him go into a scene. In a second, with a twist of the shoulder, a flicker of an eyelid, he goes into character, is completely the sinister, stern English sea captain. His stride down the deck carried more power and more authority than I thought possible in a little man. The way he planted his feet on the deck, the way he carried his shoulders, changed him instantly from a pleasant person into that ominous captain whose every move exuded cruel power.

Clark would get in quite a tussle with the animal rights people over trying to shoot a shark nowadays!  I do love these accounts of filming on the ship; it was rare in 1935 for an entire production to film on location like that.

After dinner with only roast beef, roast veal, fried potatoes, two kinds of vegetables, soup, salad, apple pie, ice cream, and coffee—you have no appetite at all on the sea!—everybody boarded water-taxis once more and went off to Avalon where there is a real motion picture theatre, to see the rushes run. And if I still entertained any notions about Mr. Charles Laughton being sedate and prim, I lost them then. There was a little delay getting the theatre lights turned on and out of the darkness from the stage came the sound of a tap dance. As the lights blazed, there was Mr. Laughton, enjoying himself hugely as he executed a soft-shoe number all by himself. When the gang yelled their approval, he bowed and recited the Gettysburg address.

The next day, “The City of Men” on the Isthmus lost its official classification. The Joan Crawford company, making “I Live My Life,” moved into camp for scenes on some old Greek ruins constructed high on a hill overlooking the bay. Women arrived in numbers, and I lost my ranking as “the only female.” And so I went home.

I do love this account of Charles Laughton! And interesting that Joan Crawford and crew arrived–Joan, the wife of Bounty star Franchot Tone and former flame of Clark’s. Clark apparently went over to visit Joan at those Greek ruins. There is photographic proof!

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You can read the article in its entirety in The Article Archive.

 

In a Nutshell: Cain and Mabel (1936)

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Directed by: Lloyd Bacon

Co-stars: Marion Davies

Synopsis: Gable is Larry Cain, a small time boxer, whose publicity team cooks up a fake romance with Mabel O’Dare (Davies), an aspiring musical star, for publicity. The two loathe each other but begrudgingly agree to play along to help both of their careers. Of course along the way they actually do fall in love and decide to quit boxing and show business to be together. Their publicists won’t hear of it however and set to break them up.

Best Gable Quote: “I’m supposed to be a fighter and what am I doing–playing post office all over the front page with a dame!”

Fun Fact: William Randolph Hearst (producer, publishing magnate and Davies’ paramour) spent $35,000 on the carousel for the musical number “Coney Island”. After filming was completed, the carousel was installed in the backyard of Davies’ Santa Monica home, near her pool and tennis courts.

My Verdict: This is Marion Davies’ picture and Clark is window dressing. His character is a one-dimensional brutish boxer, who softens like butter after Marion bats her eyelashes at him a few times. This film is definitely one of those that I wouldn’t say is a bad film as a whole, but it’s not a great Gable film. Marion shows she can sing and dance, and Clark shows he still looked good with his shirt off.

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It’s on DVD.

Read more here.

 

In a Nutshell: Love on the Run (1936)

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Directed by: W.S. Van Dyke

Co-stars: Joan Crawford, Franchot Tone

Synopsis: Gable is Mike Anthony, a newspaper reporter always in competition with his college buddy, Barnabus Pell (Tone) who works for a rival paper. When Mike attends the wedding of socialite Sally Parker  (Crawford) to a European prince, he becomes her confidante and helps her escape the nuptials. With Barnabus hot on their trail, Mike and Sally steal a spy’s plane and head across Europe. The spy wants his plane back (and his secret plans) and Barnabus wants his piece of the story, keeping them on the run, of course falling in love along the way.

Best Gable Quote: “You’re the only girl this side of the moon.”

Fun Fact: Gable and Franchot Tone had become friends during the filming of Mutiny on the Bounty and would play cards between takes. This irritated Crawford. Her and husband Tone spent most of their time between scenes fighting. During the course of filming, Tone moved out of their Hollywood home.

My Verdict: It is a rather silly film, full of madcap hijinks. Clark and Joan always do have chemistry, but here I find it watered down. I enjoy his competitive banter with Franchot much better. As a spy story and a sweet romance, it’s rather flat. Not Clark and Joan at their best.

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It’s on DVD.

Read more here.

It was Movie of the Month in November 2013.

 

In a Nutshell: Parnell (1937)

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Directed by: John M. Stahl

Co-stars: Myrna Loy, Donald Crisp, Edna May Oliver, Billie Burke

Synopsis: In this historical melodrama, Gable is Charles Parnell, an 1880′s Irish politician dubbed “The Uncrowned King of Ireland” for fighting for Irish freedom from British rule. The British trump up false charges against him to try and keep his efforts down but are unsuccessful. But then Parnell falls in love with Katie O’Shea (Loy), the estranged wife of a British Parliament member. When her husband finds out, he files for divorce and names Parnell as co-respondent, resulting in political and social ruin for Parnell.  Just as he begins to fight back for his position, he is taken ill with a sick heart.

Best Gable Quote: “Haven’t you ever felt that there might be someone somewhere who, if you could only find them, is the person that you were always meant to meet?” (How romantic is that line! I have always loved it)

Fun Fact: Gable’s least favorite of all his films and the biggest flop of his and Myrna Loy’s careers. It lost a total of $637,000 at the box office. Gable accepted the role of Charles Parnell because he saw an opportunity to prove himself as a versatile dramatic actor.  When the film flopped so horribly, he shunned all historical dramas. The flop of this picture is the main reason he was reluctant to do Gone with the Wind; he feared another historical flop. Because of the criticism of his Irish accent in this film, he refused to do a Southern accent for GWTW.

My Verdict: I stand by my long-voiced opinion that Parnell isn’t really that bad. There are some Clark Gable films (see anything thus far voted one mustache) that if it’s on TCM I flip right past it. Not this one. Clark’s performance isn’t bad, neither is Myrna’s. The script is tedious and the plot is boring. There just isn’t enough to hold interest. The love story is very sweet (although completely different than it was in reality) and Clark has some very romantic lines. I adore Myrna Loy and their chemistry is top notch as always. A fantastic film? No. But a horrible, wretched film that should be held up as the worst of Clark’s career? Still No.

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Read more here.

It was Movie of the Month in July 2013.

Ratings

In a Nutshell: Dancing Lady (1933)

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Directed by: Robert Z. Leonard

Co-stars: Joan Crawford, Franchot Tone, Fred Astaire

Synopsis: Gable is Patch Gallagher, a short-fused Broadway producer who hires down-on-her-luck ex-burlesque dancer Janie Barlow (Joan Crawford) for the chorus line of his latest show. Janie is constantly pursued by a rich playboy admirer, Tod Newton (Franchot Tone). Patch begins to have feelings for plucky Janie, but grows bitter as it becomes obvious she is wrapped up with Tod. When he promotes her to the lead in the production, Tod becomes impatient (Janie said she’d marry him if the play fell through) and pays off the Broadway powers-that-be to shut the play down. Janie finds out of his deceit (thanks to a drunken Patch) and dumps Tod. She encourages Patch to put on the show all on his own. The conclusion, the showing of the production, is a beautiful art deco showcase of dancing, singing and spectacular sets.

Best Gable Quote: “If you don’t get a good break, you get a bad one. That’s show business.”

Fun Fact: This film is the debut of Fred Astaire. His first scene was with Clark.

My Verdict: Clark hated this film. He said repeatedly for years afterward that he didn’t want to do the part and that he was miscast. He was also horribly sick on the set, suffering from pyorrhea and a life-threatening fever, so that probably didn’t help his opinion. That being said, I like it. The dance numbers are gorgeous and impressive in scale. Joan does an excellent job keeping up with Fred Astaire, which is not an easy feat. I do like these early 1930’s musicals, always with the broke girls with runs in their stockings finally hitting the big time on stage. I would say this is a good film but it is not because of Clark. Really, he is right, he was miscast. His character is moody and always yelling at everybody. This one, the rating is a bit complicated. If you are watching it because it has Clark Gable in it, then it’s two mustaches. But if you are watching it for Joan Crawford and all the singing and dancing, it’s much better.

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It’s on DVD.

Read more here.

It was Movie of the Month in September 2012.

Ratings

clark gable joan crawford love on the run

This month, Clark is a rogue newspaper reporter (again) and Joan Crawford is a spoiled heiress (again) in Love on the Run.

clark gable joan crawford love on the run

Gable is Mike Anthony, a newspaper reporter always in competition with his college buddy, Barnabus Pell (Franchot Tone) who works for a rival paper. When Mike attends the wedding of socialite Sally Parker  (Crawford) to a European prince, he becomes her confidante and helps her escape the nuptials. With Barnabus hot on their trail, Mike and Sally steal a spy’s plane and head across Europe. The spy wants his plane back (and his secret plans) and Barbabus wants his piece of the story, keeping them on the run, of course falling in love along the way.

Love on the Run is, in a word, silly. It starts out cute enough, with Clark and Franchot constantly trying to one up each other.

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But the film meanders into ridiculous territory when Clark and Joan are “on the run” through Europe, being chased by spies whose plane their stole and with Franchot on their tail. There are definitely no plot twists in this one, but it is pretty much what the masses had come to expect from a Clark Gable rom com.

Joan and Clark always have chemistry, even in a silly plot like this. The best scene in the whole film is them meeting in the beginning, with him not telling her he’s a reporter out to scoop her story as she runs out on her wedding. Their banter is classic.

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Later, while hiding out in a chateau and wearing antique duds, they share a sweet dance to a music box as they pretend to be ancient royalty. And soon after comes a typical Clark Gable pick-up line: “You’re the only girl this side of the moon.”

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Clark is definitely in his element playing a wisecracking reporter. This role was not exactly a stretch for him and he was comfortable with the director, W.S. “Woody” Van Dyke.

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Clark was recruited to star with Joan in the film because while Clark was riding high on the success of films like Call of the Wild and San Francisco, Joan’s past few films had failed miserably at the box office. So Clark was brought in as her leading man to boost her back up. My, my, how times had changed. In 1931, Joan was paired with newbie Clark in fare like Dance Fools Dance and Possessed to boost his star power.

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Nobody would have been surprised to hear that Clark and Franchot did not get along on the set of this film. Back in 1933, both were costarring with Joan in Dancing Lady. Clark and Joan had been embroiled in a heavy off-and-on affair since 1931, and when Clark missed a lot of time on the set due to illness, Franchot and Joan fell in love. Clark, despite the fact that he was very much involved at the time with British actress Elizabeth Allan AND despite the fact that he was still married to second wife Ria, felt burned when he returned to the Dancing Lady set and saw that Franchot was a frequent vistor to Joan’s trailor.

Joan and Franchot eventually married in 1935 and so were married on the set of Love on the Run, although because Franchot was pretty much doomed to sidekick Siberia in the 1930’s he gets to watch Clark woo and win his wife.

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Despite this, Clark and Franchot were actually good buddies. They had discovered they had joint loves of booze and cards while on location for their film Mutiny on the Bounty in 1935. Franchot and Joan were the two bickering on the set, actually. All was not bliss in the Tone household.

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As for Clark and Joan offscreen, Love on the Run would be their last film together until 1940’s Strange Cargo. By then, Joan and Franchot were divorced and it was Joan’s turn to be jealous…of Clark’s matrimonial bliss with Carole Lombard. Reportedly their relationship was rather frosty during the making of that film.

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Some of my very favorite publicity stills of Clark and Joan are from Love on the Run—Joan in a flowing dress that cascades out while they dance. I often see these photos online labeled incorrectly as being from Dancing Lady, but no, they are indeed from Love on the Run.

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Love on the Run is available on DVD through the Warner Brothers Archive Collection

Read more about the film here and see over 200 pictures from the film in the gallery.

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In 1933, Clark was in a musical–but no singing and dancing for him…just brooding and yelling.
In Dancing Lady, Clark is Patch Gallagher, a short-fused Broadway producer who hires down-on-her-luck ex-burlesque dancer Janie Barlow (Joan Crawford) for the chorus line of his latest show. Janie is constantly pursued by a rich playboy admirer, Tod Newton (Franchot Tone). Patch begins to have feelings for plucky Janie, but grows bitter as it becomes obvious she is wrapped up with Tod. When he promotes her to the lead in the production, Tod becomes impatient (Janie said she’d marry him if the play fell through) and pays off the Broadway powers-that-be to shut the play down. Janie finds out of his deceit (thanks to a drunken Patch) and dumps Tod. She encourages Patch to put on the show all on his own. The conclusion, the showing of the production, is a beautiful art deco showcase of dancing, singing and spectacular sets.clark gable joan crawford dancing lady
The producer of this musical extravaganza was David Selznick, whom Clark had just worked with in the ensemble piece Night Flight and would later work with in Gone with the Wind. Clark did not enjoy working with Selznick in Night Flight—finding his perfectionist ways tedious and was perturbed that the film’s many delays caused him to miss a planned fishing trip. So he was hardly excited to be working with him again in Dancing Lady. It was Selznick’s idea to take James Warner Bellah’s rags to riches novel and make it into a grand musical. Selznick had originally wanted to cast Jean Harlow, whom he had just worked with with great success in Dinner at Eight. But Joan Crawford was desperate for the role, as her career had started to take a dive after the recent failures of Today We Live and Rain. MGM wanted to tag her onto Clark’s rising star to revive her career. And the film is really Crawford’s, with her scenes practically doubling Clark’s.clark gable jona crawford dancing lady
But one of the things I really like about this film is that it is so very quintessentially 1930’s. From the scandalous burlesque-girl-makes-her-dreams-come-true storyline to the dance numbers, to the gorgeous costumes,–from itty bitty dancing rompers and fringe-lined bathing suits to esquite ruffled gowns. joan crawford dancing lady
Speaking of costumes, my oh my this was definitely the pre-code era. We have everything here from Crawford in those tiny rompers and a small bikini top, to girl cops in the finale number wearing short flippy skirts with see-through mesh tops with pasties covering their nipples! It is a role that fit Joan like a glove, as she always played “poor girl makes it big” roles at this point in her career, and she was a hoofer before she was an actress.clark gable joan crawford dancing lady
The supporting cast can’t be ignored. Yes, that’s Eve Arden with platinum blonde hair ranting and raving with a fake Southern accent after she leaves the stage early in the film. And there’s Sterling Holloway, known as the voice of Winnie the Pooh, as one the theater managers Clark ticks off. May Robson plays Franchot’s crusty deaf Grandma as only she could. That unmistakable voice is indeed Nelson Eddy in a top hat in the finale number “Rhythm of the Day” as well. Especially of note is that this film marks the first film appearance of Ted Healy and his Three Stooges, here as stagehands. clark gable the three stooges dancing lady
Oh, and that skinny, balding man hoofing it with Crawford nearly an hour into the film? Why, that would be the very first film appearance of a certain Mr. Fred Astaire. That’s right, Fred’s first scene in a film was with Clark Gable and his first dancing and singing partner was Joan Crawford! Later on in his signature hat and tails, no less.
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Fred Astaire and Joan Crawford pose outside the soundstage
Clark always described himself as miscast in the film. And it’s true. He is rather wasted. He is angry in nearly every scene, barking orders and brooding in corners. The romance with Joan seems rather forced as most of the time he’s either yelling at her or avoiding her. The one cute scene is when they both are working out at the gym. She hurts her hand and so he rubs it. She hurts her shoulder and so he rubs it. She hurts her butt…and tells him he better not!clark gable joan crawford dancing lady
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Part of the bad memory of the film for him might be because he was very sick during filming. In 1957, he recalled, “MGM assigned me to do a bad part in Dancing Lady with Joan Crawford—a picture I didn’t like. But as bad as the part was, it wasn’t as bad as my health…I’d lost a lot of weight. They’d been working me hard and I was tired. I told myself, ‘If I have a few operations, that will take care of my health and the part in Dancing Lady too.’ I had my appendix and tonsils out, but it didn’t take care of everything, for MGM was mad at me. For some strange reason they thought I’d taken evasive action to avoid their picture. They bided their time during the eight or nine weeks I was in the hospital. Then the very day after I got out they called me in and said, ‘We’re sending you over to Columbia Pictures on a loan-out.’” The loan out? That would be for a little picture called It Happened One Night, which would earn Clark his one and only Oscar.clark gable dancing ladyclark gable dancing lady
Not only were his tonsils and appendix taken out, but so were nearly all of his teeth. He had developed pyorrhea—a serious infection of the gums that threatened his life. He was extremely ill with a high fever as the infection spread. After two weeks of rest, his gums were finally well enough for indentations to be made for a new set of dentures.
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After being absent for weeks, Clark appeared back on set to film one scene: the one he has with Fred Astaire.  Clark’s mustache had been shaved off for his gum surgery and so he had to wear a fake one. In his absence, they had already filmed all of Fred’s dancing numbers and he had to finish his scenes so he could start his first film with RKO, whom he had recently signed a contract. Clark was on set just one day to film that one scene and Crawford recalled, “He was so weak, perspiration broke out on his face. I never felt so sorry for anyone.”clark gable joan crawford dancing lady
Clark and Joan had been notoriously engaged in a heated affair off and on for about two years when filming on Dancing Lady began. Clark’s long absences from the set led the bored Joan to seek comfort elsewhere–in the arms of co-star Franchot Tone. By the time Clark finally returned to set to finish the film, he had been replaced by Franchot as the main visitor to Joan’s dressing room. Joan and Franchot were eventually married in 1935.franchot tone joan crawford clark gable dancing lady
Dancing Lady is available on DVD in the Clark Gable Signature Collection. You can see over 150 pictures from the film here and read more about the film here.

A short article from June 1940 in which actress Ann Sheridan describes her ideal man:

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Right here I’d like to mention that I don’t go around describing, unsolicited, my masculine ideal to everyone I meet. What I mean is, I was asked by Movie Mirror to do this…so in describing the sort of man I would choose if I were to marry I’m contriving a sort of composite of several men I know and like and admire…

He’d dance like Cesar Romero. The Romero dancing is in a class by itself.

He’d have Joel McCrea’s physique–tall, square-shouldered, rangy and not an ounce of spare fat on him! I hate bay windows, even small ones.

He’d have Clark Gable’s eyes, gray-blue and the kind that look at your straight. He’d have Gable’s nose and simples and his strong square chin.

He’d have Tyrone Power’s teeth, strong and white.

And Bob Taylor’s mouth, the most sensitive man’s mouth I’ve ever seen.

He’d have the charm of manner such as Gary Cooper possesses.

And he’d have the courtliness and poise that mark Franchot Tone.

He’d have Jimmy Cagney’s gentleness and his high morning spirits.

My composite would have Charles Boyer’s voice, slightly mysterious, caressing, the most persuasive voice I’ve ever heard.

And William Powell’s hands, the unmistakable hands of a gentleman.

And George Brent’s sense of humor. I’d rather marry a double-dyed villain than a man without a sense of humor. He’d have George Brent’s sophistication–that savoir-faire which is an indescribable combination of tolerance, wisdom, mental and social balance; and George Brent’s quick intellect, George Brent’s dependability, George Brent’s quiet air of authority which tells you if you were married to him he’d be the boss–but you’d like it!

Important to note here is that Ann was in the midst of a love affair with George Brent at the time of this article (can you tell?).  Apparently she didn’t like George being the boss in marriage, however—they were married in 1942 and the union lasted only one year.

That is quite a man she built though!