Carole Lombard

Tracing the footsteps of the beloved third Mrs. Gable…

This house on Iris Circle, built in 1926 in the then-trendy Whitley Heights area of Los Angeles, was owned by Carole and her first husband, William Powell, from about 1931 to 1933.

Carole Lombard and William Powell's house on Iris Circle

Carole Lombard and William Powell's house on Iris Circle

It was quite a treacherous drive up a long, narrow street and there is absolutely no parking at all–heaven forbid you have guests over! (In fact I couldn’t get a shot from across the street because there were cars parked right behind me on the narrow road.) But the view from those windows must be spectacular.

Carole Lombard and William Powell's house on Iris Circle

Here’s that same window, from the real estate listing when the house was for sale about two years ago:

Carole Lombard and William Powell's house on Iris Circle

And here’s Carole in front of the window:

Carole Lombard in her Iris Circle home

The Powells had some famous neighbors, including Buster Keaton and Marie Dressler.

Bill and Carole in their Iris Circle home:

William Powell and Carole LombardWilliam Powell and Carole Lombard

After divorcing Powell, Carole moved on to this house on Hollywood Boulevard.

Carole Lombard's house on Hollywood Blvd

Carole Lombard's house on Hollywood Blvd

Carole in front of her Hollywood Blvd home

A gorgeous home, built in 1926, right in the center of the Hollywood social scene, was perfect for the newly single Carole. Truly her “bacherlorette pad”, Carole was quite the party hostess in this house and was living here when she dated singer Russ Colombo, George Raft, Gary Cooper and writer Robert Riskin.

Carole Lombard's house on Hollywood Blvd

Carole Lombard's house on Hollywood Blvd

Carole Lombard's house on Hollywood Blvd

Carole Lombard's house on Hollywood Blvd

She famously posed in her new home, complete with exquisite furnishings designed by silent star William Haines.

Carole Lombard's dressing table

This house was recently up for rent and it didn’t look like anyone lived there when I was there. The yard was unkempt and there weren’t many signs of human inhabitance. See photos from inside the home here.

Carole Lombard's home on Hollywood Boulevard

Carole began seeing Clark Gable while she resided here on Hollywood Boulevard so he visited this home often. Involved in a high profile romance, soon Carole decided she needed a more private abode, away from prying eyes….

So in 1936, she moved into this house, on St. Cloud Road in Bel Air. Built in 1926 (noticing a trend here?), she affectionately referred to the home as “The Farm”.Carole Lombard's house on St. Cloud Rd.

Carole Lombard's house on St. Cloud Rd.

The St. Cloud home when Carole lived there

Unfortuntely they were doing construction at the home (it frightens me what they are tearing down) and this big dark fence obstructed our up-close view.Carole Lombard's house on St. Cloud Rd.

 Here’s the street.

Carole Lombard's house on St. Cloud Rd.

Upon my return, I discovered the house is now for rent and it does say it is “recently renovated.” Some great pictures of the inside and outside of the home here. If those walls could talk!

The house must hold fond memories for Clark and Carole, as they spent their first night as a wedded couple here (NOT in Oatman, Arizona, no matter what they claim) and those famous pictures of them as jolly newlyweds at their day-after press conference were taken here on this lawn.

Clark Gable and Carole Lombard

Carole Lombard and Clark GableCarole Lombard and Clark Gable

Clark and Carole lived here together until their recently purchased home in Encino had completed renovations. Which means that Clark laid his weary head here at night after spending the day chasing Scarlett O’Hara on the set of Gone with the Wind.

Fun fact: After the Gables vacated, Carole rented the house to Alfred Hitchcock and his wife!

The ranch in Encino would be the last address for both Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. Post on that Thursday…

*A special thank you to Carole Sampeck of the Carole Lombard Archive for helping me out with the timeline here!